Berlin’s Neues Museum

Berlin’s Neues Museum

thumbnailLocated at a stone’s throw from the Old National Gallery, the brilliantly restored Neues Museum (New Museum) has opened its doors to the public again only in 2009. Suffering from severe damage after World War II and then neglected during the GDR period, the British architect David Chipperfield met the challenges of restoring the building to its original glory by beautifully anchoring the main body of the museum in the architectural language of the present day. This 3 walk begins by examing the present museum itself, from its initial and revolutionary 19th century conception—created by architect Friedrich August Stüler (student of Karl Friedrich Schinkel)—to its elaborate decorative program by Wilhelm Kaulbach, to the current “masterplan” of its restorer, Chipperfield.

 

thumbnail (1)During our walk we continue evaluating the recent renovation and  the very contemporary curatorial strategies used for displaying ancient art.. The museum’s collection is has an extraordinary depth displaying the development of Old World cultures from prehistory and early history. Of course the ancient Egyptian art crowns the assemblage and we consider its importance to the status of collection for the past two centuries while taking in the gems, first the ultimate highlight of the museum, the legendary 3,300-year-old bust of Queen Nefertiti, whose original color is preserved without restoration since the Amarna period.

 

Neues Museum Green HeadFurther famous examples of the delicacy of Egyptian portrait sculpture of the late period include the so-called Berlin “Green Head” named after its greenish stone. There are plenty of other treasures in the museum that are worth our seeking out, such the skull of the Neanderthal from Le Moustier, and Heinrich Schliemann’s famous treasure of ancient Troy including works of ceramics, gold and weaponery.

f4Fabiola Bierhoff is an art historian and PhD Candidate in the History and Cultural Studies program at the Free University of Berlin. She received her Bachelor in Art History at Radboud University Nijmegen in 2006 and holds a Masters in Museum Curatorship summa cum laude from the Free University of Amsterdam. Her Master Thesis on the alternative East German art scene was awarded the Annual Master Thesis Award 2010. Since 2009 she has been an art writer for the bimonthly magazine De Witte Raaf. Fabiola is currently conducting research for her dissertation, which is provisionally entitled “The Role of Autonomous Art Criticism for Performance Art in the Last Decade of the German Democratic Republic”. Her research is funded by a scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and a research grant from the Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds.
twins 1 Maria and Natalia Petschatnikov are identical twins. As visual artists they work collaboratively in the border region between painting and installation. Originally from St. Petersburg, they received their art education in the United States (BFA – Rhode Island College, MFA – Hunter College of The City University of New York) and in France (École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris). They moved to Germany in 1999 and have travelled half of Europe thanks to numerous fellowships and residency programs. The Petschatnikovs have exhibited widely throughout Europe as well and are represented by Wagner+Partner Gallery in Berlin. In addition, the sisters both teach studio art and art history at a number of schools and institutes in Berlin and Hamburg. Since 2000 they have been invited to give regular workshops and tours at the Kunsthalle Museum in Hamburg. One of the major strategies of their art production as well as their teaching lies in juxtaposing classical and contemporary art.
f1Madelief ter Braak is architectural historian and freelance writer/journalist. In 2011 she graduated cum laude with a Research Master Art History & Archaeology from the University of Groningen (the Netherlands). Fascinated by urban public space, she focuses on the use and representation of this everchanging aspect of the city in the past, present and future. In her research and writing she’s guided by unconventional sources in art, photography, literature, poetry, films and music. Cross-cultural interests and curiosity have led to several publications in very diverse (online) magazines. For Blauwe Kamer magazine on landscape development and urbanism, she writes the column ‘Standplaats Berlijn’. On her research she’s given lectures at the School of Architecture Groningen, the TU Delft and the Art historian Institute from the University of Groningen. Her masterthesis Flanieren in Berlin is written as a journey across east and west, in times of dictatorship and democracy.
  • Reserve Your Walk

    For walks within 48 hours, please e-mail a request to: [email protected]
    or phone: (+420) 777 036 515

 

Additional Costs:
Neues Museum Tickets

Individual: €12, students & seniors €6
Online shop: €11, students & seniors €5,50

We send you a separate e-mail invoice for your group’s tickets so that our guide can prepay for them, sparing you from long entrance lines. Let us know if you will be holding Museum Island passes or Berlin passes that already cover your admission to Neues Museum.

 

Groups of over 10 should contact us at [email protected] in order to get a special rate for their party.

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